Hydrothermal Energy and Ocean Carbon Cycles

Objective: The importance of hydrothermal energy transfer to the biosphere through chemosynthetic primary production has long been recognized. Initially, this was only considered to occur at discrete, isolated, hydrothermally active hotspots around the global ridge crest and to have minor impact on the global ocean carbon cycles. But recent results suggest that this assumption may not be correct. We now know that hydrothermal venting can be widespread throughout all oceans, along the entire thermohaline conveyor, and that both the local fixation of carbon and the export of bio-limiting nutrients to the broader ocean may be much greater than previously recognized. For too long, fragmentation of our understanding of biogeochemical interactions in hydrothermal systems has prevented any quantitative estimation of hydrothermally driven primary production. Now, however, recent advances in molecular methods as well as in situ and in vivo experimentation provide us with new opportunities for a coordinated, integrating effort in which interdisciplinary approaches and modelling can be brought to bear. Consequently, we believe that it is very timely to plan a revised consideration of the diverse pathways of biomass generation driven by hydrothermal processes and the potential contribution that they may make to the global ocean carbon cycle.

Co-Chairs - Nadine Le Bris (IFREMER, France), Christopher R. German (WHOI, USA)

Group Members - Wolfgang Bach (Univ. Bremen, Germany); Loka Bharathi (National Institute of Oceanography, India); Nicole Dubilier (Max Planck Institute Marine Microbiology, Germany); Katrina Edwards (Univ. Southern California, USA); Françoise Gaill (CNRS, Paris, France); Toshi Gamo (Univ. Tokyo, Japan); Peter Girguis (Harvard Univ., USA); Xiqiu Han (Second Institute of Oceanography, SOA, China); Julie Huber (Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, USA); Louis Legendre (LOV-UPMC, Villefranche, France); George W. Luther III (University of Delaware, USA); William E. Seyfried Jr (Univ. Minnesota, USA); Stefan Sievert (WHOI, USA); Ken Takai (JAMSTEC, Japan); Andreas Thurnherr (Columbia Univ., USA); Margaret K. Tivey (WHOI, USA).

(“Mirror” to SCOR WG 135; Working group formed in 2009; Developed from IRTI 2007 organized by Biogeochemical Interactions WG )

Translations of the mission statement: FrenchGermanKorean Spanish

2014 SCOR InterRidge Working Group Report

N. Le Bris 31/05/14

2012 Update

Hangzhou meeting
The second WG group meeting was held in Hangzhou, China on 10-11 October 2011. It was hosted by the 2nd Institute of Oceanography. Xiqiu Han, also a member of the WG, has been a greatly appreciated local organiser. The visit included additional exchanges with colleagues and seminars for students for several meeting attendees. The group of attendees involved L. Bharathi (India), T. Gamo (Japan), C. German (US), G. W. Luther (US), X. Han (China), N. Le Bris (France), L. Legendre (France), S. Sander (NZ) and S. Sievert (US).

2011 Update

The WG has welcomed a new associated member, Dr Sylvia Sander, from Marine and Freshwater Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Otago, New Zealand. She is a specialist in trace metal speciation in natural aquatic systems and has published several papers on the complexation of metals issued from vents by organic ligands (Sander and Koschinsky, 2011). Beyond providing a very important and complementary scientific expertise, she will add to the international representation of the WG.

2010 Update

WG 135 – Working Group Report 2010
1. First meeting objectives and participants
The first WG 135 Meeting took place in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA on 23-24 Nov. 2009. Logistical support was provided for this meeting from InterRidge, which arranged access to all meeting facilities at WHOI. The aim of this first meeting was to discuss the most relevant way to address the WG terms of reference and to clarify the expected outcomes of the WG, while discussing science plans and opportunities arising in partnership with various other initiatives.

DEBI RCN Graduate Student Education Exchange

The Dark Energy Biosphere Institute (DEBI) Research Coordination Network (RCN) on the deep biosphere funds graduate student exchanges to facilitate collaborations among deep biosphere research groups, with the end goal of building and educating the community.  Between 2-4 awards of $1-3K each will be granted annually for students to spend 1-6 months in a host lab to carry out research activities prohibitively difficult or impossible at their home institutions.
The next deadline for applications is September 1, 2010.

New SCOR Working Group: "Hydrothermal energy transfer and its impact on ocean carbon cycles"

InterRidge is pleased to announce the approval of a new SCOR Working Group in Oct. 2008, to be co-funded by InterRidge, on "Hydrothermal energy transfer and its impact on ocean carbon cycles." This new Working Group (SCOR WG 135) is co-chaired by Nadine Le Bris (IFREMER, France) and Chris German (WHOI, USA). The proposal was developed from discussions at the InterRidge Theoretical Institute (IRTI) on Biogeochemical Interaction at Deep-Sea Vents, held in September 2007.