Two Postdoctoral Research Associates in Marine Geophysics at Durham University

Applications are invited for two Postdoctoral Research Associates to join the NERC-funded projects

“Role and Extent of Detachment Faulting at Slow-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges”

and

“CAYSEIS - Crustal Accretion and Transform Margin Evolution at Ultraslow Spreading Rates”

We seek enthusiastic geophysicists with, preferably, experience in wide-angle controlled-source seismology, wishing to work within an innovative, international and interdisciplinary research team based at the Department of Earth Sciences, Durham University. We offer opportunities to develop project supervision and management skills, and gain experience of the operation of sea-going geophysical instrumentation and of the planning and execution of research cruises at sea.

Further information can be found at:

https://www.dur.ac.uk/christine.peirce/13N_MAR/13N_further_particulars.pdf 
or  https://www.dur.ac.uk/christine.peirce/cayman_trough/cayman_further_particulars.pdf

or by contacting Professor Christine Peirce (christine.peirce@durham.ac.uk).

The closing date for both posts is 30th September 2015.

Applications can be made via Durham University’s online recruitment site

https://www.dur.ac.uk/jobs/

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The projects:

A) Role and Extent of Detachment Faulting at Slow-Spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges

This collaborative research project has Project Partners at the Universities of Birmingham and Cardiff and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and will investigate the processes of oceanic crustal accretion at slow spreading rates, in particular the role played by large-offset normal “detachment” faults in the formation of oceanic core complexes at 13N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

As part of the project an extensive geophysical dataset will be acquired during a cruise on the research vessel James Cook to 13N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in Jan-Mar 2016. The post-holder will analyse and interpret the 3D ocean-bottom seismograph wide-angle, controlled-source seismic data acquired, together with the coincident gravity and magnetic profiles.

The primary focus of this post will be to determine the geometry and extent of surface observable features at depth, using P- and S-wave 3D-volume velocity models, to reveal how detachments relate to magmatic accretion in time and space. The results of this research will be integrated with those of in-parallel studies of local seismicity and multichannel seismic crustal imaging being undertaken by our collaborators.

B) CAYSEIS - Crustal Accretion and Transform Margin Evolution at Ultraslow Spreading Rates

This collaborative research project has Project Partners at Geomar in Germany and at the Institute of Geophysics at the University of Texas, and will investigate the temporal and spatial interplay between magmatic accretion and amagmatic tectonic extension, and the controls on and relationship between faulting and hydrothermal activity at the ultraslow spreading Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre in the Caribbean.

As part of the project an extensive geophysical dataset has already been acquired during a cruise on the research vessel Meteor to the Cayman Trough in April 2015. The post-holder will analyse and interpret ocean-bottom seismograph wide-angle seismic data, together with gravity and magnetic profiles, acquired in the vicinity of the Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre and Swan Island Transform intersection; the latter marks the edge of the Honduran Transform margin and juxtaposes newly-formed oceanic crust against old continental crust. The primary focus of this post will be how mantle upwelling and along-ridge magmatic plumbing may be impeded by the cooling affect of adjacent continental lithosphere, testing models of transform continental margin evolution.